Announcing​: the Anthropocene Campus Melbourne will be held 3-6 September 2018

Announcing…

Anthropocene Campus Melbourne

Dates: 3-6 September 2018

Location: Deakin Downtown and other venues, Melbourne, Australia

Hosted by Deakin University’s Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation and Deakin Science and Society Network in partnership with the University of New South Wales Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and Centro de Investigación para la Gestión del Riesgo de Desastres (CIGIDEN).

Debates over the past decade about the existence and start date of ‘the Anthropocene’ – or, the age of the human – have provided an important prompt for academics, artists and others to critically reconsider how knowledge is produced and reproduced. What forms of critique, knowledge-making and collaboration are needed to meet the challenges we now face? Building on the success of other campuses in Berlin, Philadelphia and elsewhere, Melbourne will be the stage for an Anthropocene Campus in 2018 following the meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) in Sydney on 29 August–1 September 2018. Across the four days of ACM18 participants will engage in a range of lectures, field trips, and workshops in Melbourne and the wider area exploring the theme of ‘The Elemental’.

Applications to participate in ACM18 will open in early 2018. PhD candidates, Humanities, Arts and Social Science scholars at all levels, as well as artists, physical scientists, engineers, and other practitioners, will be encouraged to apply. For now, sign up for updates and news about ACM18 here: http://eepurl.com/deSecz Or contact us at: anthrocampusmelb@gmail.com

 

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Anthropology@Deakin Episode #6: Eve Vincent

In the sixth episode of the Anthropology@Deakin podcast, David Giles and I discuss land rights and creativity with Eve Vincent (Macquarie University). Dr Vincent – a lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Macquarie University – is the author of Against Native Title’: Conflict and Creativity in Outback Australia (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2017), the co-editor (with me!) of Unstable Relations: Environmentalism and Indigenous People in Contemporary Australia (University of Western Australia Press, 2016), and she has also written for rich variety of academic and literary journals. Her work engages with ideas of indigeneity, recognition and governmentality, and she has written on issues such as native title, intercultural collaboration, and welfare quarantining. She has a long-term ethnographic engagement with the town of Ceduna in South Australia.

You can find the podcast at Soundcloud, iTunes and Stitcher. It’d very cool if you could rate, review and subscribe to us!